Posts Tagged ‘RSC

15
May
10

Friends of Grampian Stones Antiquities List Vol. XV #3 2004

DECEMBER 2004

Clatt Dolphin when it was embedded in Clatt kirkyard wall (now moved inside building)

FOGS Grampian SITES AND MONUMENTS RECORD of Antiquities submitted to HISTORIC SCOTLAND with our request for scheduling.*

*HISTORIC SCOTLAND has traditionally chosen which monuments it deems ‘suitable’ for protection (‘scheduling’). If it does not choose to schedule a monument, no responsibility is taken by this Scots state agency to protect such monuments, should any damage or disruption to such sites occur. In 2006 HS even suggested it was considering ‘delisting’ some sites. Thankfully none of these is in the Aberdeenshire area. FOGS, however, believes this is an unacceptable state of affairs in the 21st century and is doing everything in its power to change the bureaucratic view. The following list compiled by FOGS was received by Historic Scotland, but HS would not confirm whether any or all would ever receive protective ‘scheduling’.

FRIENDS OF GRAMPIAN STONES list of Scheduled (bold) and unscheduled stone monuments – with their map reference – within the former Grampian Region: the counties of Aberdeen, Banff, Moray and Kincardine (alternately known in cooncilspeak as Banff and Buchan; Gordon, Moray, Kincardineshire; since late 2006, historical county boundaries have been abolished – but only in cooncilspeak; not in the eyes of historians). The following list was presented to Historic Scotland and note taken by the keepers of the Grampian Site and Monuments Record. It is recorded here as an internet record of proceedins Perhaps a future Scots government will take more care of this irreplaceable resource. MC Youngblood 2009-2010

COUNTY-DISTRICT
[scheduled monuments appear in bold]

    MAP REFERENCE ANTIQUITY

ABERDEEN
NJ 859 044 Blacktop (Cottage) cup & ring-marked stone 190m NNW of
NJ 844 105 Clinterty Home Farm standing stone 130m N of

BANFFSHIRE AND BUCHAN
NJ 679 481 Hill of Laithers (Carlin) standing stone 490m N of Raecloch
NJ 722 498 St Congan’s Church and Class III Stone 450m NW of Bridge of Turriff
NJ 839 562 Upper Auchnagorth, stone circle 290m SE of
(A98 between New Pitsligo and New Byth)
NJ 983 415 Skelmuir Hill, standing stone 500m SW of South Howe
NJ 982 417 Skelmuir Hill, standing stone 500 m SW of South Howe
note: Skelmuir is littered with flint sherds from prehistoric workings

Afforsk Pictish Class IV cross-incised boundary stone between ancient church boundaries - Monymusk and Chapel of Garioch - at Afforsk

KINCARDINE AND DEESIDE
NJ 411 063 Blue Cairn, recumbent stone circle 320m WNW of Ladieswell Cottage
NJ 622 031 Gownieburn, standing stone 140m N of (Learney Stone)
NJ 616 036 Sundayswells Hill, ring cairn 540m W of West Learney
NJ 4865 0349 Tomnaverie recumbent stone circle, Tarland (restored) with outlier markers (solstice sun rise/sets)
NJ 504 054 Culsh Earth House, Tarland
aligned to solstitial sunset over Tomnaverie RSC in valley below; cupmarked entrance stone to passage (HS)
NJ 603 035 Balnacraig, recumbent stone circle 150m W of
NO 287 951 Abergeldie Castle, standing stone 120m S of
NO 524 990 Image Wood, stone circle 370m WSW of Mains of Aboyne
NO 503 998 St Machar’s Cross, cross 400m NNW of Dykehead
NO 780 976 Park House, Class I Pictish stone 100m N of
NO 703 957 Banchory Manse Wheel Cross, Class III stone in N wall of garden, Raemoir Road (FOGS: moved?)
NO301 962 Rinabaich Chapel and standing stone 200m SW of Bridge of Gairn Road (FOGS: Chapel Marjorie)
NO 774 794 Court Stone, standing stone 250m E of Mondynes farmhouse
NO 741 961 Milton of Crathes two class III Pictish stones
NO 706 957 Banchory-Ternan church and cross-slab in graveyard 110m S of church, corner main road and Raemoir road
NO 820 778 Moray Stone, standing stone 500m N of Mains of Barras, Arbuthnot
NO 875 895 Kempstone Hill, cairns and standing stones 500m NE of Standingstones (Muchalls)
NO 847 975 Standingstones, standing stone 250m SE of; Netherley Road, Maryculter (second stone destroyed)

Rear ogham discovery on Dyce Class II Pictish stone, retrieved and retained by HS

GORDON – Central Aberdeenshire
NJ 498 271 Rhynie Market Square, two Class III Pictish symbol stones
NJ 470 266 Brawland, cupmarked boulder 300m SW of
NJ 497 263 Crawstane, Pictish symbol stone and circular enclosure 300m NW of Barflat
see recent (2011) excavation
results from Universities of Aberdeen and Chester project
NJ 551 265 Tofthills stone circle and cross-inscribed stone 100m SSW of
NJ 549 271 Sunken Kirk (Tofthills) stone circle and Pictish Class IV cross-inscribed stone at NJ 552 266
NJ 592 255 Braehead recumbent stone circle and cupmarked stone 350m WSW of
NJ 579 251 Ringing Stone., cupmarked stone 430m WNW of Cotetown
NJ 538 259 Clatt Kirk Pictish Class I stones in kirkyard* one dolphin; other double disc
*since compiling this list one stone (double disc) has been lost, the other moved inside building, now community center with limited access
NJ 539 468 Hillhead of Avochie, cupmarked boulder 280m SW of
NJ 698 066 Balblair, standing stone phallus (Christchurch) 420m NNE of North Lurg
NJ 683 156 Deer Park, Monymusk stone circle 170m ESE of The Clyans
NJ 602 177 Castle Forbes carved stone 450m NNE of Moonhaugh
NJ 626 186 Casstle Forbes carved stone 620m SW of Moonhaugh
NJ 676 257 Gowk Stane (Max Hill) standing stone (destroyed stone circle) 220m SW of Old Westhall
NJ 664 264 Westerton of Petmathen standing stone 400m NNW of
NJ 669 326 Cairnhill Class III stone 120m ENE of cottage gatepost (Culsalmond quarry)
NJ 751 077 Dunecht House Class IV cross-incised stone 80m SSE of
NJ 738 083 Old Wester Echt (HS calls New Wester Echt) recumbent stone circe 170, SW of farmhouse New W.E.
NJ 748 096 Nether Corskie (HS: Upper Corskie) recumbent stone circle remnant with Pictish carved stone 530m SE
NJ 766 132 South Leylodge recumbent stone and flankers 150m E of
NJ 762 132 South Leylodge 2 standing stone 550m W of
NJ 761 133 South Leylodge 3 standing stone 720m WNW of
NJ 769 130 South Leylodge 4 standing stone 180m SSE of
NJ 763 129 Leylodge School standing stone 160m E of
NJ 764 128 Leylodge School 2 standing stone 300m E of
NJ 723 149 Lang Stane o’ Craigearn standing stone 45m N of Littlewood

8thC Pictish Class IV Cross-incised stone embedded in steading wall Kirkton of Bourtie

NJ 710 134 Woodend standing stone 300m N of
NJ 730 123 Braeneil standing stone 270m NNE of
NJ 760 237 East Balhalgardy Pictish Class I in N facing lintel window
NJ 800 249 Kirkton of Bourtie steading and Bourtie Kirkyard wall, Class IV 8thC Pictish incised cross stones emvedded in steading and wall
NJ 768 377 Fyvie Kirk Pictish Classes I and III stones embedded in church E wall
NJ 801 063 Gask (HS Springhill) standing stone 500m NNW of
NJ 816 138 Cairntraidlin Stone, standing stone 350m WSW of
NJ 802 146 Ferneybrae standing stone 80m NW of
NJ 821 143 Kinellar Kirk recumbent stone and flankers embedded in kirkyard perimeter wall
NJ 821 144 Kinnellar Kirk Pictish Class I stone in vestibule of disused kirk
NJ 823 106 Tertowie Nether Mains, standiing stone 100m NW of
NJ 915 146 Lochhills standing stone 310m E of Bishop’s Loch
NJ 958 304 St Mary’s Church, Ellon Class III carved stone in N wall
NJ 921 348 Candle Stane, standing stone 200m NE of Drumwhindle Croft
NJ 823 136 The Scotsmill Stane, standing stone 400m SE of Cairntradlin

Part of an eagle wing with bird's feet on an unscheduled carved Pictish stone in Forgue

MORAY

NJ 039 588 Rosebank, St Leonard’s Road, Forres symbol stone in garden wall
NJ 149 259 Balneilean Class I stone 400m N of Tomintoul Distillery (N bank River Avon)
NJ 194 504 Redtaingy standing stone 1350m SSE of Upper Glenchapel
NJ 152 683 Camus’s Stone cupmarked stone 175m SSE of Inverugie House
NJ 145 681 Gallowhill cup-and-ring-marked rocks 330m NE of Backlands of Roseisle
NJ 162 627 Knock of Alves stone circle 700m S of Newton House
NJ 209 278 Bridge of Nevie standing stone 200m NNE of

Whitestones House, Rothiemay garden wall, Drumblair bird? Also Bourtie cross-incised stones in steading and kirkyard wall
DES 1999:9 Tullo Hill, Drumblair, Forgue (illustrated) partial wing and feet of bird (supposed eaglestone), Pictish carved stone in woodland, unlisted (FOGS discovery)
DES 2002:11 Garden wall Rothiemay unlisted Pictish carved stone

03
Dec
09

Friends of Grampian Stones 2003 winter solstice news vol.XV #1

FOGS MIDWinter Newsletter’ December 2003/ January 2004: Volume XV-1

Sine umbra nihil

Well-wishing for a new year is what we do in the Northeast when the calendar points to January. It was always so. Or was it?

In Gregorian, we count this 2004. It is already 5764 Jewish time. In a month (February 2004) it will be the Chinese year of the Monkey; on February 22 Islam moves into 1425. For Sikhs, new year (536) comes just before vernal equinox when Hindus (2061) and Persians (1383) celebrate, just as we used to before the Julian calendar adjusted new year from March to January.

Ethiopia still runs on the Julian calendar, which served most of the western world until 1752 or thereabouts, depending on one’s allegiance. Russia was slow to make the change, but that is no surprise to the Clavie Crew of Burghead (Moray) or to the fireball-swingers of Stonehaven, Kincardineshire. They still run on Julian time.

burning clave on flaming fire altar in Burghead's Pictish fortress

Burning clavie atop flaming 'Doorie' (fire altar) at Burghead; running on Julian calendar time

In Burghead, lighting the eternal fire and carrying it round the town reenacts the celebration of the return of new light after the longest night – the dark of our title, without which we have ‘nothing’. To the Clavie King and torch-bearers of Burghead, this is Aul’ ’Eel, pre-Christian Yule or winter solstice. Yule becomes interchangeable with Christmas south of the border but Scotland has held to its pagan festival of Hogmanay, itself a testimony to and turning point in that Roman calendar.

On Hogmanay night Steenhivers have a street party to end all street parties. Whereas Burghead (annually January 11) only spills combustible materials over the shoulders of Clavie-bearers, Stonehaven delights in spinning fire in clumps into the unwary crowd.

When Scotland changed calendars in 1752, there was much misunderstanding in the country districts – the loss of 11 days seen as having robbed them of important events. At that time, clavie-burning and local celebrations to mark the return of the light after midwinter were commonplace in all the northern and northeastern ports. Now only two remain holding to tradition from an earlier time, Burghead most precisely still counting its lost 11 days.

Fire for the clavie is ritually kindled from a peat ember – no match is used. Clavie king and crew dispense flaming brands from burning tar-barrel as tokens of abundance to important burghers, publican included! They circle the town sunwise and the final free-for-all happens after the clavie has been fixed to its fire-altar, the doorie, on a rib of the old Pictish ramparted stronghold, and left to die. Julian indeed.

Yggdrasil:the world tree

Every culture, beginning with the Polynesians, had its ‘world tree’, a great being of life and knowledge which connected through its forever-turning axis the heavens, earth and the nether realms.

It is to Norse myth that we owe a debt for transmitting the name Yggdrasil: an ash, at whose three roots were sacred fountains ‘of wondrous virtue’, and in whose branches sit an eagle (international symbol of visionary power), a squirrel (symbolic of activity and preparedness), and four stags (innocence and return to wilderness).

In our original state of grace the world and the heavens, time and space, were one, held in hologram by this great turning spindle, but then chaos intervened.

In Scandinavia, this great gyroscope or ‘mill’ was thrown into the deep, now forever grinding sand and stones, creating whirlpools and hurricanes. Greek Kronos/Chronos the Titan, child of heaven and earth – Ouranos and Gaia – after emasculating his father and throwing the great pole into the sea, became father of the gods. Romans separated the two into Saturn and Time, but the original dual concept was intentional.

It was left to subsequent generations who believed their ancestors to have been gods, to try to make sense of a universe spinning progressively out of kilter, a fact seen in the Greek ‘royal science’ of astronomy in the steady precession of the equinoxes: a cosmic mill forever churning stars which no longer return to their ‘right time’. The tree had been uprooted by giants and only heroes with like powers might replicate the act.

In Finland and India, it is called a mill from Sampo, Sanskrit skambha, in England it is an oak or mythic Excalibur extracted only by a ‘true’ prince.

In Northeast Scotland until at least 1945, sacred wells were still complemented by the presence of an ash, though uprooting it appears not to be part of the legend until the coming of bulldozers in modern development. That aside, if the discovery of ‘Seahenge’ in 2003 off the East Anglian coast connects us to our ancestors at all, it is through the ritual of a massive oak, carefully-placed upside-down, huge roots exposed to the heavens, within a sacred precinct of guardian tree-stumps at a place where earth and ocean meet.

Might we not be seeing some vestige of that ancient rite conceived by man to right his Universe and return it to that golden age (Virgil’s Saturnia regna) before the fall, when time was eternal and heaven-and-earth were one?
©MCY2004-2009

Winter Wonders

Several years occur when midwinter full moon does not completely tie in with solstitial sunset: 2003 was one of those years*. Full moonrise nevertheless was an impressive sight at two recumbent stone circles on either side of the Garioch plain: at Easter Aquhorthies (NJ733 208) and the Barra RSC (older country name for Bourtie, NJ801 249) where FOGS stalwarts braved the winter’s first storm to witness a lunar prelude to the darkest days. On December 8th, nearly two weeks before the shortest day, the full moon rose, regular as a cosmic clock, at the moment of sunset over the whitened slope of Crocker hill (compare our solar eclipse point in June n/l XIV-2). It is the same point for each circle, as both appear to be aligned on this double axis of solstitial summer sun and winter moon.
*at 2009 archive transcribing; full moon rose at same point on December 2nd

While the sunset is obscured at Aquhorthies by the lie of the land, it has full view of rising moon. In contrast at Barra, sunset is fully visible over Mount Keen (at latitude 57ºN this is 223º), but moonrise takes another five minutes to materialize on the Crocker (at 43º or NNE).

There may be another link between the two RSCs which time forgot. From the Easter Aquhorthies recumbent an alignment towards Barra and moonrise leads the eye directly over the huge red-jasper sentinel at the modern ‘entrance’. It is not a large leap in imagination to connect its fiery red with a dyiing sun.

What has not previously been noted is the presence of pink quartz in a NNE vector-like scatter in the two fields leading from the Barra circle upslope to the ‘moonrise’ rock (the ‘Bellman’, also sunrise rock in our previously noted summer newsletter) at 600 ft/185m, Barra has substantial quantities of white quartz stones ringing it radially in all other directions, but the NNE scatter is decidedly more pink: a synchronicity perhaps unnoticed by many of us, but not without apparent significance to the circle-builders.

©2003-2009 MCYoungblood

Sacred Journey
Lawrence Main, peripatetic extraordinaire, is making a sacred journey throughout Britain. He plans to spend three nights on Bennachie in Aberdeenshire as part of his communion with the earth, thanking the Mither for her part in holding a vision of what this ancient stronghold and Pictish kingdom meant to its people. We do not publish his dates, for privacy, but wish him well on his pilgrimage.




Cleopas

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