Archive for the 'messages' Category

16
Mar
12

Friends of Grampian Stones 2006 Lammas newsletter Vol.XVII#2

2006 Lammas Newsletter Vol.xvii #2 August, 2006

The Lunar Wobble

The Apprentice Pillar, 15thC Rosslyn Chapel, see below

FOGS JUNE 2004 solstice newsletter started the alert for all this wobble-watching. Now, two months after the wobble — lunar maximum occurred Sunday, June 11, 2006 when the moon reached its major standstill — we on the 57th degree parallel are experiencing withdrawal from our companion in orbit.

Orkney, Shetland and Lapland watchers are even more deprived, as the earth’s satellite barely shows her face at full above the southern horizon. This, its wildest fluctuation in the 18.6-year Metonic cycle, will continue into the autumn months. However by winter solstice we shall once again have a companion in full visibility in the night skies.

Think of it this way: in the darkest days of December, the sun at our latitude rises in the south-east and sets in the south-south-west, barely grazing the tops of some of our frostly hills.

This summer, the full moon has been doing just that: rising qnd setting (on full moon night and a couple of nights on either side) in roughly those same compass points, reflecting in amazing precision the path of our solar partner.

That is a simplification. It means if we aren’t looking in the right place, chances are we’ll miss it. It is more precise to say that on October 22, 2005, the moon was closest to full (71%) while standing at its most northerly position in our skies for 18.6 years.


By definition, quarter moons stand at the most northerly point in the sky.

For an exact calculation, check Victor Reijs and our FOGS moon standstill posting, immediately below. There is a discussion group at Archaeocosmology.

Many archaeoastronomers believe that some cupmarks on NE Scots recumbent stone circles mark the maximum moonset for this cycle. If so, then the circle-builders’ technology predated Meton (432BC) by some 3000 years.

Those of us planning to attend FOGS’ 2006 AGM at Cothiemuir on September 16th will be able to check for ourselves as the large recumbent there displqys a cluster of cupmarks on its face with a view angled farthest to the SSW — the most extreme viewing position possible from within the circle. Cothiemuir, NJ617 198, is accessed from My Lord’s Throat, and is one of the earliest of the NE’s RSCs. Contemporary neighboring Old Keig has the largest recorded recumbent stone, weighing in at 53 tons.
©2006-2012MCYoungblood

Message in a Bottle: Crichie Past

Beaker grave cremation pot and horn spoon found in 1855 by Dalrymple at Port Elphinstone henge, 'Druidsfield', Broomend of Crichie

During last summer’s excavation by Dr Richard Bradley’s team from Reading University at Druidsfield, Crichie, Port Elphinstone, Inverurie, a communication from the past was unearthed. The henge itself left a few clues to its use as a sacred processional terminus during the Bronze Age (one-mile-long stone avenue between Kintore and Crichie), but the message-in-a-bottle was far more precise in date. It was found standing upright in a spoil heap left by a previous archaeologist, and contained small fragments of window glass wrapped in a sheet of the Penny Free Press & Northern Advertiser

The glass was inscribed with the names of antiqurian Charles Elphinstone Dalrymple, his two colleagues and the local farmer of Broomend, with the date of their excavation, November 22, 1855. Victorian antiquarians frequently left small tokens for their successors to find.

Dalrymple’s family owned Logie, near Pitcaple; sometimes called Logie-Elphinstone. The Port Elphinstone excavation was one of his favourites and showed most detail: including the avenue of 72 megaliths stretching between Crichie and Tavelty, Kintore. Only two of these avenue stones remain.

Another feature now lost to the Reading team which Dalrymple was fortunate to find and record was a triple-ring circle a few metres north of the Druidsfield henge — now forming basement and foundations of a Port Elphinstone housing development. It is hoped the Reading team’s interest in the Kintore corridor will help protect it from further blanket development. The corridor sadly runs parallel with the A96 dual carriageway between Thainstone Mart and the Kintore Industrial Estate. ©MCN

Aberdeen Pictish Conference

Pictish eagle fragment found on Tullo Hill at Forgue-- DES 1999:9 first Pictish eagle-stone to be discovered in the 'Kingdom'

University of Aberdeen’s Research Institute for Irish and Scots Studies will host a conference entitled Fresh Pict: Problems Revisited at King’s College on Saturday, November 28th, 2006. At that time papers previously addressed to the prestigious Leeds International Medieval Conference will be given. The list of speakers is impressive:

Lloyd Laing, Simon Taylor, David Dumville, Gordon Noble, Nicolas Evans, Strat Halliday, Andrew Heald and Mike King. It is refreshing to see work continuing in the NE where Pictish fragments continue to be found, viz. Forgue eagle-stone, left (DES 1999:9) and a ‘creature’ found in a garden wall at Rothiemay (DES 2002:11). More information available from the Institute, Kings College, University of Aberdeen.
DES = Discovery and Excavation Scotland, whose online documentation of earlier DES publications has reached 2008.

daVinci Sparks Interest in Rosslyn
Rosslyn Chapel, south of Edinburgh, has traditionally attracted the specialist visitor interested in its alleged connection with the Knights Templar and the Holy Grail. Following the release of Dan Brown’s ‘daVinci Code’, visitor numbers have tripled.

Rosslyn's 15thC barrel-vaulted ceiling divided into five compartments. The crypt has Templar carvings.

The Rosslyn Chapel Trust chose a timely moment to make a record of what is probably a unique example of late-Medieval ecclesiastical architecture of the pre-Reformation period.

The chapel was begun in 1446 at around the same time as work started on Glasgow Cathedral. It is one of the few remaining intact pre-Reformation chapels left in Scotland. It towers over the edge of Rosslyn Glen, whose layers of sand, gravel and clay have posed subsidence problems in the past. One exit from the crypt opens on to a gravel bed.

AOC Archaeology Scotland have been employed to create a laser scan record of both interior and exterior; they hope to avoid pitfalls encountered in photography, where a substantial exterior scaffolding canopy –needed for the work– masked several unique features. Scanning has resulted in remarkable three-dimensional and 2D images of the building and its extravagant architectural idiom. This includes the lavishly-decorated interior with its now-famous ‘apprentice pillar’. It is the first full high-precision record to be made on the site and will prove invaluable for research, conservation and for future generations to refer to as a baseline for the building as it now stands.

It is hoped many of the scanned images will be made available on the web.
©FOGS 2006-2012

10
Aug
09

Crystalline transmission from Jasper

When it rains, my skin gleams.

Jasper's volcanic red light

Jasper's volcanic red light

I am Jasper.   I live on the inside.  It’s what all you humans are searching for – this journey within to the heart of one’s being.  We crystalline entities have always known how to transmit this ability, to shine from the inside out.  Perhaps that is what we are here for: to show you.  It is difficult, I know, to look at me, rock that I am, albeit deep red scorched and gleaming from ancient volcanic fires, and think of me as a being.  But I am, like you, a child of the Earth.  The Earth breathes through me just as she does through you and we are all embedded in her skin – some of us more fixed and immovable than others.  

There was a time when I was envious of the human ability to move about, to walk, to anchor, to touch, to think, to feel, to interact with the Earth’s species.  Even longer ago, I remember a time when I was more fluid (but then I suppose that was when I was a liquid, not a solid, so you probably dismiss my thought as irrelevant).  In those days we were all important in helping create the Earth as you see her now.  Before the dinosaurs, even before plants and bacteria, before oxygen: now you see what I’m getting at.  

It is nice to remember all this because nowadays there aren’t a lot of beings I can share this with.  And humanity!  just so busy and self-consumed and planning the next thing – impossible to catch his eye and say, hey! slow down a minute, I’ve got something I want to tell you.   

So I pretty much sit here, shining in the rain, – a single jasper on a circumference of other very attractive but oh-so-plain stones – perched on the edge of a stone circle overlooking an ancient river basin; a circle created by your ancestors for reasons you and the rest of your kind can no longer remember.  What a calamity that must be: to have all your history spread in the countryside before you but with no inkling of which part fits where.  You know, they left you all the keys, so you could unlock the mysteries.  You’ve just forgotten that you mislaid them.  In your race to compete with each other to be the most intelligent, the most left-brained, the most accoladed, the most applauded of humans, you forgot your connection to the Earth, who gave birth to us all.  It is true: you were created to become the Earth’s antennae, to be her intellect, to use your circuitry to connect her to the spheres, but if you can’t remember that your feet, like mine, are supposed to be earth conductors to make that happen, then I am more likely to be a better conductor than you – to play the music of the spheres with more orchestration and verve than you, in your short-sightedness, will be capable of performing.

Forgive me – just feeling a little blue today, for all my fiery glow.  Give me another aeon; by then I’ll probably be feeling better.  

In the meantime, please try to remember where you misplaced your connection. It’s important for all of us.  We can’t do it without you. Seriously. Check and get back to me.  

We’ll speak again soon.   Love, Jasper.

Jasper guards the entrance to Easter Aquhorthies

Jasper guards the entrance to Easter Aquhorthies




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